• 1st September
    2014
  • 01
americanlibraryassoc:

September is Library Card Sign-Up Month - a time when the American Library Association and libraries across the country remind parents that the most important school supply of all is @ your library® - it’s your library card. September was first so designated in 1988, as a continuation of a national campaign launched the previous year.
Free promotional tools (PSA, banners for use with social media, etc) featuring this year’s Honorary Chairperson Stan Lee now available at the official page,September is Library Card Sign-up Month (see Library Card Sign-up Month History for names of prior Honorary Chairpersons/Spokespersons). 
Contact Library Card Sign-up Month Campaign Coordinator Megan McFarlane of the ALA Public Information Office with questions.

americanlibraryassoc:

September is Library Card Sign-Up Month - a time when the American Library Association and libraries across the country remind parents that the most important school supply of all is @ your library® - it’s your library card. September was first so designated in 1988, as a continuation of a national campaign launched the previous year.

Free promotional tools (PSA, banners for use with social media, etc) featuring this year’s Honorary Chairperson Stan Lee now available at the official page,September is Library Card Sign-up Month (see Library Card Sign-up Month History for names of prior Honorary Chairpersons/Spokespersons).

Contact Library Card Sign-up Month Campaign Coordinator Megan McFarlane of the ALA Public Information Office with questions.

(via teenlibrariantoolbox)

  • 30th August
    2014
  • 30

When you are 13 years old,
the heat will be turned up too high
and the stars will not be in your favor.
You will hide behind a bookcase
with your family and everything left behind.
You will pour an ocean into a diary.
When they find you, you will be nothing
but a spark above a burning bush,
still, tell them
Despite everything, I really believe people are good at heart.

When you are 14,
a voice will call you to greatness.
When the doubters call you crazy, do not listen.
They don’t know the sound
of their own God’s whisper. Use your armor,
use your sword, use your two good hands.
Do not let their doubting
drown out the sound of your own heartbeat.
You are the Maid of Untamed Patriotism.
Born to lead armies into victory and unite a nation
like a broken heart.

When you are 15, you will be punished
for learning too proudly. A man
will climb onto your school bus and insist
your sisters name you enemy.
When you do not hide,
he will point his gun at your temple
and fire three times. Three years later,
in an ocean of words, with no apologies,
you will stand before the leaders of the world
and tell them your country is burning.

When you are 16 years old,
you will invent science fiction.
The story of a man named Frankenstein
and his creation. Soon after you will learn
that little girls with big ideas are more terrifying
than monsters, but don’t worry.
You will be remembered long after
they have put down their torches.

When you are 17 years old,
you will strike out Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig
one right after the other.
Men will be afraid of the lightening
in your fingertips. A few days later
you will be fired from the major leagues
because “Girls are too delicate to play baseball”

You will turn 18 with a baby on your back
leading Lewis and Clark
across North America.

You will turn 18 
and become queen of the Nile.

You will turn 18 
and bring justice to journalism.

You are now 18, standing on the precipice,
trembling before your own greatness.

This is your call to leap.

There will always being those
who say you are too young and delicate
to make anything happen for yourself.
They don’t see the part of you that smolders.
Don’t let their doubting drown out the sound
of your own heartbeat.

You are the first drop of a hurricane.
Your bravery builds beyond you. You are needed
by all the little girls still living in secret,
writing oceans made of monsters and
throwing like lightening.

You don’t need to grow up to find greatness.
You are stronger than the world has ever believed you to be.
The world laid out before you to set on fire.
All you have to do
is burn.

  • 11th August
    2014
  • 11

thekevinmarshall:

If you ever doubt your ability to continue coping with the day to day, you are not broken. If you need help, you are not weak.

Contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, 1-800-273-TALK.

(via betheboy)

  • 3rd August
    2014
  • 03
I think also there’s things that you reject in your teens that you liked when you were a little kid. If things were too girly, at least for me, I was a tomboy, so I could never admit that I actually liked My Little Pony. But I’m in my 30s, and [at this age], you just kind of return to the things that were a little bit magical and mystical.
Jenny Lewis (via
  • 30th July
    2014
  • 30
  • 26th July
    2014
  • 26
  • 22nd July
    2014
  • 22
I see now that dismissing YA books because you’re not a young adult is a little bit like refusing to watch thrillers on the grounds that you’re not a policeman or a dangerous criminal, and as a consequence, I’ve discovered a previously ignored room at the back of the bookstore that’s filled with masterpieces I’ve never heard of.
Nick Hornby, quoted in this excellent article Young Adult Literature Is Better Than You Think (via hapfairy)

(via lareviewofbooks)

  • 18th July
    2014
  • 18
scholasticreadingclub:

So, Bill Hader was a Book Clubs kid, too! 

"You’d get that little catalog and check off two or three books, and a week later you come into class and there would be a parcel on your desk — it was like Christmas! The first series I was obsessed with was James Howe’s “Bunnicula.” I read all of those. Then I moved on to Madeleine L’Engle’s “A Wrinkle in Time” and its sequels."

from The New York Times

<3 

scholasticreadingclub:

So, Bill Hader was a Book Clubs kid, too! 

"You’d get that little catalog and check off two or three books, and a week later you come into class and there would be a parcel on your desk — it was like Christmas! The first series I was obsessed with was James Howe’s “Bunnicula.” I read all of those. Then I moved on to Madeleine L’Engle’s “A Wrinkle in Time” and its sequels."

from The New York Times

<3 

  • 15th July
    2014
  • 15

The biggest issue with equating the library with a Netflix for books is that it sends a false message that libraries are worth little more than $8 or $12 or $20 a month. That the services offered in libraries are little more than options to which people can subscribe, rather than actual services anyone can utilize at any time.

When the library is made to be seen as a business, rather than the heart of a community or a fundamental service made possible through citizen-approved tax dollars, it makes the library expendable. That expendability then moves down the chain: staff salaries get cut, then staff withers, then more programs and projects that benefit the community — books and movies and CDs and magazines and newspapers and wifi and computer access and database subscriptions and programs for all shapes, colors, and sizes of people — disappear, too. It detracts from the unique aspects that make a library what it is: a place for all, rather than a place for some.

Libraries reach out where Netflix reaches in.

  • 14th July
    2014
  • 14
Letter to Baby Author Me revisited

theallycarter:

Hi everyone!

Doing a retro-throwback post today!

Because, you see, in a few weeks I’m going to be giving a speech at the Day of YA Pre-Conference at the Romance Writers of America Convention in San Antonio.

(And, don’t forget, I’ll also be signing in San Antonio on July 23. If you live in the…